Categories

This category is defined as any original artwork digitally created and modeled in three dimensions using specialized software. Software may include, but not be limited to, Maya, AutoCad, Sketch Up, GollyGee Blocks, and Light Wave. You may have up to 2 people on a team but teams and individuals will compete against each other within each grade grouping. Regardless of the length of the project, the judge time is 15minutes. Judges may only view a portion of the actual project. Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.      Download Rubric »
This category is defined as an original design with the primary purpose for allowing for the motion of objects. Software may include, but not be limited to Adobe Flash, KidPix, etc. You may have up to 2 people on a team but teams and individuals will compete against each other within each grade grouping. Regardless of the length of the project, the judge time is 15 minutes. Judges may only view a portion of the actual project. Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.      Download Rubric »
This category is defined as any original audio production that has been edited/produced with digital software. Projects may include speaking, singing, music, sounds effects, and other audio components. Software may include, but are not be limited to – Audacity, Garage Band, Wavosaur, etc. The project must be displayed on a computer in the program in which it was created. The student should be prepared to demonstrate to judges how the software was used to create the finished project. You may have up to 2 people on a team. Teams and individuals will compete against each other within each grade grouping. Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the category rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.      Download Rubric »
This category is for devices engineered and/or modified by students to serve a specific purpose or meet a specific goal. Device and parts do not have to be new. However, the device must be fully functional. Some examples include, but are not limited to: Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and Makey Makey projects. Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.      Download Rubric »
Digital Game Design was formally called Game Design, and should include original content, design, and rules of an interactive game. Students may use the software program of their choice in order to demonstrate creativity, originality, organization, and interactivity. Students should be able to explain to judges what inspired their game idea and how they programmed their game to achieve project goals. You may have up to 2 people on a team but teams and individuals will compete against each other within each grade grouping. There will be a 15 minute judging time limit on all entries.      Download Rubric »
This category is defined as any computer created original project using original student photographs. The project must be displayed on a computer in the program in which it was created. The student should be prepared to demonstrate to judges how the software was used to create the finished project. A hard copy of the finished project may be displayed but is not required. You may have up to 2 people on a team but teams and individuals will compete against each other within each grade grouping. There will be a 15 minute judging time limit on all entries. Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.      Download Rubric »
This category is defined as any student created, computer-generated, non-animated graphic design project. Digital Photography and 3D Modeling are NOT part of this category. The student(s) must be able to display the content from the source project files using the program it was created in. Software may include, but not be limited to, Paint, KidPix, Photoshop, Corel Draw, Illustrator, or Free Hand. You may have up to 2 people on a team but teams and individuals will compete against each other within each grade grouping. There will be a 15 minute judging time limit on all entries. Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.      Download Rubric »
Projects in this category have strength in their use on networks, either the World Wide Web or LANs (Local Area Networks). Examples of Internet application projects include web pages, web sites, chat rooms, interactive games, bulletin boards, podcasts and blogs. Your computer is required to display this project. Internet access will not be available at the fair. All links must be captured one level deep. No tri-board displays. You may have up to 2 people on a team but teams and individuals will compete against each other within each grade grouping. Regardless of the length of the project, the judge time is 15 minutes. Judges may only view a portion of the actual project. Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.      Download Rubric »
An entry in this category is an app that is specifically developed for a mobile device (phone, tablet, smart-device, etc.). This app can be developed for any operating system (Android, iOS, Windows Mobile, etc.) as long as the student has a device or simulator that can run the app on the day of the fair. (This category does not include mobile-friendly web pages – please see the Internet Applications category). Pre-planning documentation materials such as a storyboard and a flowchart are required. You may have up to 2 people on a team but teams and individuals will compete against each other within each grade grouping. There will be a 15 minute judging time limit on all entries.      Download Rubric »
Multimedia projects are defined as computer-based reports or creative presentations using any combination of sound and/or images with text. Possible software used for projects in this category include but are not limited to: Power Point, KidPix, AppleWorks, Astound, Storybook Weaver and HyperStudio. If appropriate to the project, a storyboard may be displayed to show sequencing of project creation. Videos do not go in this category. Any hyperlinks need to be captured one level deep since Internet access will not be guaranteed. NO tri-boards are allowed. Grade levels for this category are 3-4, 5-6, 7-8, 9-10, and 11-12. The computer is required to display the project. You may have up to 2 people on a team but teams and individuals will compete against each other within each grade grouping. Regardless of the length of the project, the judge time is 15 minutes. Judges may only view a portion of the actual project. Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.      Download Rubric »
This category, formally called Non-Multimedia, is defined as any student created, computer-generated project that uses desktop publishing or general productivity software. Entries can be developed from various non-multimedia application programs such as word processing, spreadsheets, databases or any other non-multimedia software. This category includes, but is not limited to, desktop publishing projects. Hard copies of projects may be displayed at original size to show the judges, but no large displays are allowed, including tri-board displays. You may have up to 2 people on a team but teams and individuals will compete against each other within each grade grouping. Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.       Download Rubric »
Projects in this category are self-executing programs created using recognizable programming languages such as BASIC, C++, Pascal, LOGO, etc. All parts of the program must be the author’s own design. Programs must be identifiable in one of the three following categories:

  • Computer-aided instruction or educational/learning games.
  • Business or commercial applications.
  • Personal applications that, with minor alterations, could be marketed for larger commercial audiences.

You may have up to 2 people on a team but teams and individuals will compete against each other within each grade grouping. Regardless of the length of the project, the judge time is 15 minutes. Judges may only view a portion of the actual project. Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.      Download Rubric »

Projects may be constructed from kits or published drawings, modified from other devices to create new applications, or constructed from the student’s own concepts and designs. All entries must be a working and functional piece of electro-mechanical hardware in which movement and intent is controlled through student created programming. Examples of commercially available kits are robotic “arms” or robot movers, Lego and K’Nex style building kits, Capsella, VEX, and Technics style robotics kits. Devices controlled through direct, real time remote control by the student are not appropriate (ie: remote controlled cars). Once started, the robotics project should operate as a standalone independent machine without human interaction. A project may have a single member or a two person team, but teams and individuals will compete against each other within grade groupings. Regardless of the length or complexity of the project, the judge time slots are 20 minutes in length. Judges may view only a portion of the actual project. Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.      Download Rubric »
This category is defined as any original video project that has been edited on a computer with digital video editing software and exported into a digital video format. The project must be displayed for viewing on a computer. A project may have a single member or a two person team, but teams and individuals will compete against each other within grade groupings. Regardless of the length or complexity of the project, the judge time slots are 20 minutes in length. Judges may view only a portion of the actual project. Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.      Download Rubric »

All projects will be judged by the following:

  • Originality – Was the entry original, creative, and imaginative in content and implementation?
  • Clarity – Was the student presentation to the judge clear? (Nervousness will not count against the student)
  • Documentation – Did the student receive and document all required permissions?
  • Appropriateness – Was the technology/software used appropriately matched?
  • Design – Does the overall design support the project purpose?

    At the time of the judging, students will be required to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the software as it relates to the project.
  • Explain the various aspects of the creation of the project.
  • Defend their choice of software for the project.
  • Answer judges’ questions about the project.

Judge periods are 15 minutes for ALL categories. To allow time for judges to fill out the Student Feedback form, students should be prepared to explain and demonstrate the highlights of their project in no more than 15 minutes.

Projects are evaluated by the judges to determine the best project in that category. The judges use several instruments for making their evaluation. Judges will provide each student with a feedback form listing strengths, weaknesses, and suggestions for each project. Actual scoring materials will NOT be released.